# Saturday, 07 December 2013

The <input> tag has been around a long time and supports a number of values for the “type” attribute (“text”, “checkbox”, “hidden”, etc.) HTML5 adds a number of new allowed values to the input type attribute. These are designed to capture specific types of input data. Allowed values are

  • color
  • date
  • datetime
  • datetime-local
  • email
  • month
  • number
  • range
  • search
  • tel
  • time
  • url
  • week

For example, if you want the user to enter a color value, use the following markup:

<input type="color" name="MyColor">

In Chrome, this markup renders a button that, when clicked, displays the following popup, allowing users to select the color of their choice.

image

Some browsers render different controls for these input types. For example, Chrome renders a popup calendar for the date type and a color picker for the color type. Browsers that don’t support custom controls simply render a textbox.

Even if no special control is rendered, the behavior of these objects is affected by the type value. Two properties – valid and invalid – were added to input tags in HTML5 and these property values change depending on the input type value and the data entered by the user. For example, if a user attempts to enter text into a <input type=“number”> control, the valid property will be set to false and the invalid property will be set to true. You can access this property either through JavaScript or through CSS, which is a good way to provide visual cues that a user has not correctly completed a form.

The new Input types are a great way to make it easier for users to input data into your forms; to restrict user input based on the expected data use; and to validate form input.

HTML5 | Web