# Sunday, May 13, 2012

Here is Darrell Hawley's presentation at GANG10, the October 1 event celebrating 10 years of the Great Lakes Area .NET User Group. Darell tells a parable describing how projects can be run right or wrong.

Sunday, May 13, 2012 3:36:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, May 12, 2012

Here is Bill Wagner's presentation at GANG10, the October 1 event celebrating 10 years of the Great Lakes Area .NET User Group. Bill talks about asynchronous programming, including the new features coming in C# 5.

.Net | C# | Video
Saturday, May 12, 2012 3:39:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Friday, May 11, 2012

The Great Lakes Area .NET User Group celebrated 10 years this past October with an all-day event, kicked off by a Leon Gersing Keynote. Here is a video of that keynote

Friday, May 11, 2012 4:39:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, May 7, 2012
Monday, May 7, 2012 4:19:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Friday, May 4, 2012

At Codeslingers last night, someone pulled out some coding Katas. For those who don’t know, a Kata is a coding exercise that is designed to practice your programming skills, rather than to solve a particular business problem. I was handed the classic “FizzBuzz” problem. The assignment:

Create a function that will print the integers from 1 to 100 with the following exceptions:

  • If a number is divisible by 3, print the word “Fizz” in place of that number.
  • If a number is divisible by 5, print the word “Buzz” in place of that number.
  • If a number is divisible by both 3 and 5, print the word “FizzBuzz” in place of that number.

The output should look something like the following:

1
2
Fizz
4
Buzz
Fizz
7
8
Fizz
Buzz
11
Fizz
13
14
FizzBuzz
16

I started with a C# console application because that is the language with which I am most familiar. It was able to finish the following in under 2 minutes. It took me 5 minutes to write the unit tests.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int i = 1; i < 100; i++)
        {
            var p = FizzBuzz(i);
            Console.WriteLine(p);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    protected static string FizzBuzz(int i)
    {
        if (i % 15 == 0)
            return "FizzBuzz";
        if (i % 3 == 0)
            return "Fizz";
        if (i % 5 == 0)
            return "Buzz";
        return i.ToString();
    }
}

I only occasionally code in JavaScript, so I tackled that language next. Someone recommended using http://jsfiddle.net/
as an online IDE for writing and sharing JavaScript, so I tried it and liked it. Of course, JavaScript is a dynamic language and one of my big challenges was spelling things correctly without all the help Visual Studio provides when writing in a statically-typed language. In my case, I misspelled the id of a div, which cost me at least 15 minutes. I created the following boilerplate HTML:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="fizzbuzz"></div>
    </body>
</html>

Then, I used the following JavaScript (plus a bit of jQuery) to output the FizzBuzz results:

for (i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
    $("#fizzbuzz").append(function() {
        var newLine = i;
        if (i % 3 === 0) {
            newLine = "Fizz";
        }
        if (i % 5 === 0) {
            newLine = "Buzz";
        }
        if (i % 15 === 0) {
            newLine = "FizzBuzz";
        }
        var newDiv = $("<div>").text(newLine);
        return newDiv;
    });
}

A simple program like this provides a fun way to practice an old language and to learn a new language. Next up, I’ll try this program with F# and Ruby, since I have very little experience with these languages.

Friday, May 4, 2012 12:40:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Wednesday, May 2, 2012
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 5:56:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, April 30, 2012
Monday, April 30, 2012 3:00:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Sunday, April 29, 2012

Here is a video of Seth Juarez's Machine Learning presentation at the Great Lakes Area .NET User Group in January 2012.

Sunday, April 29, 2012 6:58:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)

Here is a video of Sarah Dutkiewicz’s Powershell presentation from the February 2012 Great Lakes Area .NET User Group (GANG) meeting.

Sunday, April 29, 2012 3:01:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, April 28, 2012

Here is the video of Glenn Block’s presentation at the November 2011 Great Lakes Area .NET User Group (GANG) meeting. Glenn described his 2 latest projects: Web API and node.js.

Community | Video | Web
Saturday, April 28, 2012 3:59:00 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)