# Sunday, October 11, 2020

The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss claims that you can earn more by working 4 hours per week than you currently make working 40 hours. I don't know about that, but the book does contain some good advice to use your time more efficiently.

A good chunk of this book focuses on starting and running your own business. Ferriss covers delegation of authority, marketing strategies, distribution options, and setting prices.  I am not really interest in starting a business, but I still got some useful information from the book.

I most liked his discussions on time management and how to free up your schedule by being deliberate about how you spend your time. 

Her is some of Mr. Ferriss's professional advice:
-Check email less frequently and at set times during the day. Never first thing in the morning.
-Avoid meetings. Ask for the notes instead.
-Eliminate those tasks that are unimportant and/or unproductive
-Delegate tasks you cannot eliminate. You can outsource many of these tasks for a small fee.
-Reduce interruptions. Require a clear agenda before meeting with someone
-Let everyone know you are very busy (even if you are not)
-Use autoreplies and FAQs to respond to questions

He also includes some advice about life beyond business
-Don't defer your rewards until you retire. Instead, take "mini-retirements" several times a year to enjoy life.
-When your work week reduces to 4 hours, fill your time with something fulfilling
-Define your goals. Do you want to be a millionaire, or do you want to live a millionaire lifestyle?

This book has its flaws. It is padded with testimonials (labeled as case studies) and Ferriss comes across as arrogant.

Some of the material here is out of date. Is Yahoo really the best place to launch an online store? Many of now the communication services he recommends are now available free from cell phone providers. Some of the companies and services he recommends no longer exist. But he maintains an active blog to address these changes.

I don't buy into the goal of the title. I don't aspire to work only 4 hours per day, so I don't set that as a realistic goal. But I did find enough useful information in this book to make it worthwhile.

The single biggest impact the book had on me came about halfway through reading it: I set it down and scheduled a vacation for next week!

Sunday, October 11, 2020 9:35:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, October 10, 2020

I was in high school when I first read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye - about the same age as the narrator Holden Caufield.

I did not have much in common with Caufield. I have never attended or even visited a private boarding school, much less been kicked out of several as Holden had. At 15 or 16, I did not have the cash necessary to hide and entertain myself in Manhattan for three days. And I did not have the nerve to strike up conversations with strangers or attempt to buy liquor in a bar or hire a prostitute.

But something about Holden's inner monologue resonated with me.  He felt alone in the world - disconnected from his surroundings. He wavered between feelings of superiority over the phonies in his life and inadequacy due to his own failings. He was intelligent, but unfocused - a classic underachiever.

Holden is an extrovert. He craves the company of others and has no trouble approaching strangers. But he is self-destructive and manages to destroy nearly every relationship in his life. Rude to nearly everyone - sometimes flying into a rage at the slightest provocation. Although his observations are often profound, their legitimacy is damaged by his focus on the negative. Haunted by the death of his brothers, he stumbles through life with no plan. The only genuine relationship he has is with his younger sister Phoebe.

Holden is far from likeable. He is too judgmental and far too cynical; but his frustration is understandable, which makes him relatable. He is the worst parts of me - judging the faults of those to whom he is attracted, but harboring resentment against himself. Holden is my feelings of alienation, angst, and insecurity that rear their ugly heads from time to time. 

I felt this a lot in high school.

And now – decades later – I sometimes still fall into that same pit.

Saturday, October 10, 2020 9:02:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, October 5, 2020

Episode 629

Wilfried Motchoffo on A Path to a Tech Career

Wilfried Motchoffo did not take a straight path to a Tech Career. He immigrated to the US 4 years ago from France and Cameroon. He was homeless for almost a year and learned English before teaching himself coding, then taking software engineering classes. A chance encounter while driving for Lyft led to a Microsoft internship.

Monday, October 5, 2020 9:15:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Sunday, October 4, 2020

10/4
Today I am grateful for a walk through the woods with Pat in Harbor Springs, MI yesterday.

10/3
Today I am grateful to see Deb Talan in concert last night.

10/2
Today I am grateful
-for Hattan's help with my questions yesterday about Kubernetes and Helm
-to explore the artwork at the Harold Washington library yesterday

10/1
Today I am grateful for all the educational videos available online.

9/30
Today I am grateful that I turned off the debate last night when I recognized I was not learning anything useful.

9/29
Today I am grateful for a ride around Goose Island yesterday.

9/28
Today I am grateful to attend the Hyde Park Jazz Festival yesterday.

9/27
Today I am grateful for my first visit to the Garfield Park Conservatory yesterday.

9/25
Today I am grateful for new bed sheets.

9/24
Today I am grateful for a bike ride along the trails in Skokie yesterday.

9/23
Today I am grateful for the lady who cleans my home a couple times a month.

9/22
Today I am grateful to speak at the Chicago Cloud Conference yesterday.

9/21
Today I am grateful to stumble upon a bunch of Mexican and Latinx picnics and music while riding through Humboldt Park yesterday.

9/20
Today I am grateful I've been able to maintain this exercise program for the past 2 months.

9/19
Today I am grateful for Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her lifetime of service to this world.

9/18
Today I am grateful for Jazz Showcase and the impact it has had on the local music scene for over 7 decades.

9/17
Today I am grateful that my sister sold her house yesterday.

9/16
Today I am grateful for ebooks

9/15
Today I am grateful for a walk around Wrigleyville last night with Tim.

9/14
Today I am grateful for lunch yesterday on the beach.

9/13
Today I am grateful for jazz music

9/12
Today I am grateful to finally hang these posters and photos in my home.

9/11
Today I am grateful for my annual physical this morning.

9/10
Today I am grateful to learn something new every day.

9/9
Today I am grateful to work with my personal trainer after a months-long interruption.

9/8
Today I am grateful to awaken to a gently falling rain in the early morning.

9/7
Today I am grateful for my new eyeglasses.

Sunday, October 4, 2020 1:23:42 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, October 3, 2020

It has been two and a half years since I last visited the universe of Miles Vorkosigan. Other books called to me and drew me in after I finished "Memory", but I still feel a fondness for Miles - the son of a Baron of the galactic empire of the far future, who overcame sever birth defects to lead a life of adventure.

This month, I resumed Miles's story with Komarr.

Serious injuries sustained in the previous book (Memory) have forced Miles to retire from active military duty and become an Imperial Auditor. But life as an Auditor is far from boring. Miles travels to the colony planet of Komarr to investigate the destruction of a terraforming satellite. Komarr is significant to the galaxy due to the number of nearby wormholes, which make interstellar travel possible. It is also significant to Miles as the Miles's father was falsely accused of ordering the massacre or innocent civilians here a generation ago.

Here Miles discovers that money is diverted from the terraforming operation; he is captured twice; he investigates the deaths of two government officials; and he uncovers a plot against the empire.

And, as so often happens in Lois McMaster Bujold's novels, Miles is distracted by the beautiful Ekaterin. This potential romance stands out as the author fleshes out the character of Ekaterin very well. In fact, some of the story is told from her point of view - a rarity in a Miles story.

Komarr has all the elements that make Bujold's novels enjoyable - a resourceful but flawed hero; a mystery to solve; and more than one human interest story.

I look forward to continuing my journey through this universe.

Saturday, October 3, 2020 9:15:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Thursday, October 1, 2020

GCast 96:

Using the MinIO Java Client SDK

Learn how to use the Java Client SDK to upload and download files to/from a MinIO server

Code: https://github.com/DavidGiard/MinIO_Java_Demo/releases/tag/GCast096

Database | GCast | Java | MinIO | Screencast | Video
Thursday, October 1, 2020 9:49:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Monday, September 28, 2020

Episode 628

Alexandria Storm on Natural Language Processing and Inclusion

Alexandria Storm talks about the importance of having an inclusive group when developing software. She recently completed an internship with the Microsoft Bing team and she describes how a diverse representation can improve natural language processing - making searches more relevant by supporting different languages and dialects and taking into account location-sensitive searches.

She also discusses the importance of inclusion among tech companies and entrepreneurs for underrepresented groups, such as women, people of color, and queer and trans people.

Monday, September 28, 2020 9:09:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Sunday, September 27, 2020

When Fat Charlie's father died, he learned some secrets about his family: Charlie had a brother named Spider; and their father was in reality the mischievous god Anansi.

Spider shows up at Charlie's door and almost immediately begins using his magic to disrupt Charlie's life.

Neil Gaiman's Anansi Boys is a series of misadventures that takes the reader through alternate realities, ghosts, animal gods and demi-gods, voodoo, and a Caribbean kidnapping. The story draws a contrast between the timid, hyper-average Charlie and his father and brother, who spent their lives focused on wine, women, and song. But it also takes us through transformations as each brother is influenced by the other.

Like the spider-god Anansi, this story weaves a web that traps the characters and the reader in a funny, intriguing quest.

It is great fun in the way that Neil Gaiman has perfected. An excellent story, even by the standards set by Neil!

Sunday, September 27, 2020 9:46:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Saturday, September 26, 2020

I enjoyed Eternity's Wheel more than the first two books of the InterWorld trilogy. As with the preceding books, Neil Gaiman's name appears at the top of the authors list, but it was actually written by Mallory Reaves with her father Michael assisting with the ideas.

This book wraps up the FrostNight saga that began in volume 2 - The Silver Dream.

The villains of Binary (which derives their power from science) and HEX (which derives their power from magic) have launched FrostNight in order to destroy all the different earth's from the different dimensions in order to take dominion over the chaos that remains. Joey Harker and the countless other versions of himself that make up InterWorld are battling to stop them. They are assisted by Timewatch - a police force that seeks to stabilize threats to the time stream.

The book is not complex but it introduces some interesting new characters and evolves some existing ones; and includes some clever possible time loop twists.

Saturday, September 26, 2020 10:39:00 AM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)
# Thursday, September 24, 2020

GCast 95:

Creating a MinIO Agent for Azure Blob Storage

Learn how to use MinIO to manage blobs in an Azure Storage Account

Thursday, September 24, 2020 12:25:40 PM (GMT Daylight Time, UTC+01:00)